Definitions

Sexual Exploitation: any actual or attempted abuse of a position of vulnerability, differential power, or trust, for sexual purposes, including, but not limited to, profiting monetarily, socially or politically from the sexual exploitation of another.

  • Source: UN Secretary-General’s Bulletin on protection from sexual exploitation and abuse

Human Trafficking: involves the recruitment, transportation, harbouring and/or exercising control, direction or influence over the movements of a person in order to exploit that person, typically through sexual exploitation or forced labour. It is often described as a modern form of slavery.

  • Source: Public Safety Canada

Sexual Violence: any sexual act or attempt to obtain a sexual act by violence or coercion, unwanted sexual comments or advances, acts to traffick a person or acts directed against a person’s sexuality, regardless of the relationship to the victim, in any setting. It occurs in times of peace and armed conflict situations, is widespread and is considered to be one of the most traumatic, pervasive, and most common human rights violations.

  • Source: Wikipedia

Sex Work: the exchange of sexual services, performances, or products for material compensation. It includes activities of direct physical contact between buyers and sellers…as well as indirect sexual stimulation. The term emphasizes the labour and economic implications of this type of work.

  • Source: Wikipedia

Prostitution (Dictionary Definition): the work of a prostitute: the act of having sex in exchange for money; the use of a skill or ability that is not appropriate or respectable; the state of being prostituted; debasement

  • Source: Miriam Webster Online Dictionary

Prostitution (Historical Definition): the common lewdness of a woman for gain. In all well regulated communities this has been considered a heinous offence, for which the woman may be punished, and the keeper of a house of prostitution may be indicted for keeping a common nuisance.

  • Source: A Law Dictionary, by John Bouvier. Published 1856

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s